Nuno Felting

Yesterday I was lucky enough to spend the afternoon being taught nuno felting by my Embroiderer’s Guild friend Ann Williams. Ann is a very talented felt artist and also runs the Edinburgh Young Embroiderers.

Nuno felting involves felting fibres to fabrics. Fabrics such as silk gauze will result in beautifully draping items whilst heavier fabrics can be used to create more sculptural items.

My experience of felting is very limited so it was great to receive expert tuition. To begin Ann had gathered together a selection of different fabrics – light and medium weight silks, cotton, nylon lace, polyester and a polyester backed foil fabric – these were loosely tacked together and felted as one to produce a sampler.

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Fabric side, shows the puckering effect.

 

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Felted side.

As you can see the felted side reveals quite a few gaps; the examples that Ann showed me had a beautifully smooth felt side with any texture added by other fibres whilst the fabric side was well puckered, to the extent that any design on the fabric was indistinguishable.

I decided to have another go today to see if I could improve my technique; I still have a way to go but I think I’m getting there.

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Fine cotton lawn

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Ribbed viscose silk

 

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Silk Chiffon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Builder’s cotton scrim

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Felted side

 

 

Great texture and very lightweight.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Printed silk scarf

 

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Felted side

 

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Heavy cotton scrim, my most successful sample!

 

I need to get the wool fibres to come through the fabric much more.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deliciously crunchy, well puckered weighty sample.

 

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Felted side

 

 

 

 

 

 

I think the trick to getting a more ‘blended’ fabric is to work the fibres more but I will need to consult with Ann on this.

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